Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance

Dreams_from_my_father

“The underlying struggle – between worlds of plenty and worlds of want; between the modern and the ancient; between those who embrace our teeming, colliding, irksome diversity, while still insisting on a set of values that binds us together, and those who would seek, under whatever flag or slogan or sacred text, a certainty and simplification that justifies cruelty toward those not like us…”

-President Barack Obama

I first read Dreams from My Father as a wide-eyed eighth grader experiencing the fervent excitement of some and profound anguish of others upon the prospect of America having its first Black president. The book was on one of my mother’s many bookshelves, and I spent days captivated by the interesting life of then-Senator Obama. Looking back, I feel that his autobiography really provides insight into the way in which he has governed this nation and thus recommend it to all.

Per Amazon.com, “In this lyrical, unsentimental, and compelling memoir, the son of a black African father and a white American mother searches for a workable meaning to his life as a black American. It begins in New York, where Barack Obama learns that his father—a figure he knows more as a myth than as a man—has been killed in a car accident. This sudden death inspires an emotional odyssey—first to a small town in Kansas, from which he retraces the migration of his mother’s family to Hawaii, and then to Kenya, where he meets the African side of his family, confronts the bitter truth of his father’s life, and at last reconciles his divided inheritance”.

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