What’s Happening at UCLA this Summer?

UCLA is bringing on the heat this summer. The Bruin campus has been abuzz with activity lately with two professional soccer teams practicing, Nickelodeon’s Kid’s Choice Sports Awards, freshman orientation sessions, a plethora of summer camps, and even an unfounded bomb threat. With so much going on, campus security has stepped it up a notch, leaving some students frustrated with the disturbances. UCLA has blocked … Continue reading What’s Happening at UCLA this Summer?

Hard-Boiled Detective Fiction Writer: Raymond Chandler

Summertime brings to mind three things: high temperatures, Hollywood-style sexual tension, and good, old-fashioned mystery. The High Window by Raymond Chandler delivers it all on a silver ash tray — with colorful characters, a hard-boiled detective, clandestine crime, and witticisms to delight your debonair heart. It’s a classic murder mystery novel, and I can’t believe I only now found out about Chandler considering how much he … Continue reading Hard-Boiled Detective Fiction Writer: Raymond Chandler

#SummerReadingChallenge

It’s summer! And whether you’re vacationing at the beach, interning at a company, or just chillaxing at home, summer’s the best time for some good, fun reading. If you don’t know where to start, take part in the #SummerReadingChallenge and try some of WSP’s suggested summer reading. We’ll recommend a new title every week, so you’ll have plenty to look forward to. We wish you … Continue reading #SummerReadingChallenge

Humor Online: McSweeney’s Internet Tendency

Here’s a problem that has plagued literature lovers through the years: you like reading, but books are expensive. How do you satisfy your bibliophilia if you don’t have money? While the library used to be the go-to place for penny-pinching readers in the past, the Internet is the modern poor reader’s lifeblood. From blogs to poetry to short stories to full-length novels, the Internet makes … Continue reading Humor Online: McSweeney’s Internet Tendency

Art Exhibit: “Generation Wealth” at the Annerberg Space for Photography

Wealth. Fame. Beauty. Social status. We have a profound obsession with affluence in America — and it’s spreading. In Generation Wealth, internationally-acclaimed filmmaker and photographer Lauren Greenfield has documented the globalization of materialism, celebrity culture, and social status over the past 25 years through 195 prints, 42 interviews, and accompanying multimedia projections and short films. Located at the Annenberg Space for Photography, the exhibit is … Continue reading Art Exhibit: “Generation Wealth” at the Annerberg Space for Photography

Are Asians Included in the Term “People of Color”?

Okay, let’s just dive right into a difficult topic: race. Disclaimer: it’s going to be messy, since I’m not used to talking about race, but I feel it has to be done. I have always been confused about the term “people of color” (PoC) and my relationship to that category. As a Korean, am I included when people talk about “people of color”? While various … Continue reading Are Asians Included in the Term “People of Color”?

Daily Tidbit: Quote about Literacy

Literacy is a bridge from misery to hope. It is a tool for daily life in modern society. It is a bulwark against poverty, and a building block of development, an essential complement to investments in roads, dams, clinics and factories. Literacy is a platform for democratization, and a vehicle for the promotion of cultural and national identity. Especially for girls and women, it is … Continue reading Daily Tidbit: Quote about Literacy

Hangul: The Democratic Alphabet

We see writing everywhere in our daily lives, but we rarely stop to think about where these squiggly lines came from and how they came to represent words. Some written languages came about thousands of years ago when they were developed from simplified drawings. Others combined writing systems that existed before them in a mix-and-match style to create their own unique writing. Still others sprung … Continue reading Hangul: The Democratic Alphabet

Daily Tidbit: A Brief History of the Green Card

Information adapted from CitizenPath. The green card has changed many times since its inception in 1940 after World War II. The First Green Card (1940-1977) The Alien Registration Act of 1940 required all foreign-born persons in the U.S. 14 years of age and older to be fingerprinted and register their presence at a U.S. post office. The forms were forwarded to the Immigration and Nationalization Service (INS), … Continue reading Daily Tidbit: A Brief History of the Green Card

Try Your Hand at “Assimilation,” by E. L. Doctorow

For busy college students like me whose reading mainly consists of textbooks and articles for class, or anyone with little time on their hands, reading full-length novels from start to finish can feel quite daunting. Luckily, there are all kinds of things to read in the bookstore, the library, or out in the World Wide Web — from 500-plus page novels, to shorter novellas or … Continue reading Try Your Hand at “Assimilation,” by E. L. Doctorow

Celebrating Diversity Through Culture Nights

UCLA is home to a wide array of people from all kinds of backgrounds. Located in Los Angeles, which is quite appropriately known as a multi-cultural melting pot, UCLA boasts a special claim to fame as one of the most diverse schools in the nation. Diversity is one of UCLA’s core values because it allows the school “to provide a broad, enriching educational experience that … Continue reading Celebrating Diversity Through Culture Nights