Let’s Talk Pills: Medication that Talks Back

Your iPad isn’t the only tablet that can talk to you. Now, even the medications you ingest have the ability to communicate with you! On November 13, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first ever digitally trackable pill, Abilify MyCite. So how does it work? First, a doctor prescribes the pill. When the patient consumes the pill, the medicine sends a signal to … Continue reading Let’s Talk Pills: Medication that Talks Back

Daily Tidbit: Quote of the Day

“Are you not thirsty?” said the Lion. “I am dying of thirst,” said Jill. “Then drink,” said the Lion. “May I— could I —would you mind going away while I do?” said Jill. The Lion answered this only by a look and a very low growl. And as Jill gazed at its motionless bulk, she realized that she might as well have asked the whole … Continue reading Daily Tidbit: Quote of the Day

Thinking in Math: How Certain Languages Make Learning Math Easier

“一二 , 一二 (one two, one two),” I counted as my tiny toddler feet ascended the stairs. The first two Chinese numbers were—according to my mom—my first words. Growing up, my peers at school would always joke about the stereotype that Asians (specifically, Chinese Asians) were good at math. Although it does not always hold true that Chinese students can solve linear differential equations faster … Continue reading Thinking in Math: How Certain Languages Make Learning Math Easier

Archive: It vs. It’s, The Final Showdown

This is an archived post from 10/20/2014 by Paul Simon Yim. It’s really hard, sometimes, to know when to use its or it’s. We’ve been taught, since elementary school, that whenever we want to indicate a possessive noun that an apostrophe must be used. For example, This is Cindy’s car. That is Brian’s computer. What we often forget, however, is that when we want to use a pronoun … Continue reading Archive: It vs. It’s, The Final Showdown

Things to Eat and Do at Fengjia Night Market

I really wanted to go out. I spent the entire day inside, avoiding the oppressive and wet heat outside. No matter how much I begged, my mom refused to come with me to the night market. “You’re 12 now. You can take the bus there yourself.” The idea of taking the bus alone at night in a foreign country frightened me, but my craving for … Continue reading Things to Eat and Do at Fengjia Night Market

Pool Thoughts: Stay in Your Lane

Swimming is probably the only sport that I would ever voluntarily do. I love swimming. I love that I can’t feel the sweat dripping down my back. I love the exhilarating thrill from that initial push off the wall. I love feeling as though the weight of the world were lifted from my shoulders. But there’s one thing that I absolutely can’t stand: people who … Continue reading Pool Thoughts: Stay in Your Lane

Trump Breaks Campaign Promise but Continues Efforts to Weaken Obamacare

On September 25, President Trump’s attempt to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was overturned when Republican senator Susan Collins voted against the motion. Repealing and replacing Obamacare was one of Trump’s main campaign promises; it is evident now that the president will be unable to fulfill his promise, at least within his first year in office. According to the New York Times, Republicans, believing … Continue reading Trump Breaks Campaign Promise but Continues Efforts to Weaken Obamacare

Daily Tidbit: Quote of the Day

Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter—tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther. . . . And one fine morning—- So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past. _____________________________________ F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby Continue reading Daily Tidbit: Quote of the Day

Art in Science: “Leave of Absence” by Michael McGowan

As a life science major, the majority of the texts I read are academic, scientific, and generally lacking in emotion. Although these readings are informative, they make me appreciate the few times when I stumble across science literature that pulls at the heartstrings. The Beat is a student-initiated journal that combines the worlds of science and art. It’s a collection of artwork, photography, and creative … Continue reading Art in Science: “Leave of Absence” by Michael McGowan

The Chicken and the Egg: Reading and Writing

More often than not, students believe that the only way to improve their writing is to use fancy vocabulary words and to memorize arbitrary grammar rules. However, they’ll quickly find that blindly focusing on technical skills is not the answer. Rather, the answer may not even lie in the act of writing itself. Studies show that reading and writing go hand-in-hand: the more you read, … Continue reading The Chicken and the Egg: Reading and Writing

Introduction to Introductions

Writing the introduction paragraph is always my favorite part of any essay. A good introduction sets the tone and structure of the entire paper. Writing a strong, solid introduction sets your paper up for success. Different styles of papers (i.e., analysis, narrative, research) call for different kinds of introductions. In general, the “funnel” introduction is the most common for papers involving literary analysis. As the … Continue reading Introduction to Introductions

Abbreviations and Milk Tea: Differences in Chinese and English

Pearl milk tea, or 珍珠奶茶 (zhen’zhu nai cha), is the staple, most iconic dessert drink of the Bay and Taiwan. Often abbreviated in English to PMT, the delicious concoction is never referred to as ZZNC in Chinese. Rather, its name is shortened from four characters to two: 珍奶 (zhen nai). So what are the differences in abbreviating English words versus Chinese words? In English, phrases … Continue reading Abbreviations and Milk Tea: Differences in Chinese and English