Museums to Visit in Los Angeles

If you’re in Los Angeles for the summer, make sure to check out these cool museums: 1. Chinese American Museum-Housed in the oldest building in Los Angeles’ “Old Chinatown,” the Chinese American Museum informs the public about the Chinese American experience and history in Southern California. A majority of the artifacts in the museum come from cherished possessions donated to the museum by Chinese American … Continue reading Museums to Visit in Los Angeles

Asian American Beauty Standards

“She’s so dark!”, exclaimed two saleswomen on the side of the road in Mandarin as I passed down the streets of Flushing, Queens with my best friend. I tossed the comment aside at that moment, thinking that it was made abruptly and only because the ladies assumed I did not speak Mandarin. Looking back, I’ve come to realize that this idea of “being too dark” … Continue reading Asian American Beauty Standards

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

Since May is Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, I decided to compile a list of some of the most notable Asian American Pacific Islanders in history. Keep in mind that this list is not comprehensive. 1. Fred Korematsu: A civil rights activist who objected to the internment of Japanese Americans during WWII. 2. Vincent Chin: Chinese American man who was severely beaten. His death sparked … Continue reading Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

Careers for Bilingual Speakers

As the world becomes increasingly connected through globalization, the ability to speak more than one language has become increasingly crucial in the workplace. This week, I’ve compiled a list of interesting careers that are suitable for bilingual people. Social Worker (Avg. $43,619) – A social worker is heavily involved in personal details of their client’s lives. They are often tasked with visiting families, identifying their … Continue reading Careers for Bilingual Speakers

Made in America: Popular “Chinese” Food

After making a recipe book as my creative project for one of my Asian American Studies classes, I couldn’t stop thinking about food. We often consume without much thought but there are so much culture and history behind each dish. I wanted to devote this blog post to the supposed “Chinese” foods that were created in America. Below is a list of some interesting dishes … Continue reading Made in America: Popular “Chinese” Food

One City, Multiple Ethnic Enclaves

With Spring Break just around the corner, I decided to compile a list of different ethnic enclaves in Los Angeles. Visiting these enclaves is a great way to immerse yourself in culture and experience something different. Chinatown Located in downtown Los Angeles, Chinatown is easy to spot with entrances like the Twin Dragon Towers Gateway. LA’s Chinatown has been around since the 19th Century and … Continue reading One City, Multiple Ethnic Enclaves

Tips for Reading Difficult or Challenging Material

It’s hard to read long, extensive works; it’s harder to read them in an unfamiliar language. Recently, someone came into my drop-in’s and asked for advice on effective methods to read long research papers in preparation for her final. I thought it might be a question that a lot of people are curious about so I decided to do some research. Below are some tips … Continue reading Tips for Reading Difficult or Challenging Material

The Politics Behind the Hyphenated Identity

In the United States, the term “hyphenated American” refers to the use of a hyphen (-) between the name of an ethnicity and the word “American.” You might have seen “Asian American” written as “Asian-American.” The hyphenated American concept came into existence during the second wave of immigration, which was from 1820 to 1890, as a way to encourage assimilation. Arriving immigrants added the hyphenated … Continue reading The Politics Behind the Hyphenated Identity

Lunar New Year Phrases

If you’re seeing red after Valentine’s Day, it’s probably because of Lunar New Year. Red is often associated with the holiday because it symbolizes good fortune and joy. Lunar New Year is one of the most important holidays of the year for Asian communities. Since it follows the cycle of the moon, the date is different each year. This year’s Lunar New Year falls on … Continue reading Lunar New Year Phrases

Dispelling Five Common Myths About Teaching ESL/ELL to Write

1) Myth: The ultimate goal for ESL/ELL learners is to speak/write like native-language speakers. When teachers think the ultimate goals for ESL/ELL learners is to speak and write like native-language speakers, they usually focus on the surface structure of the language–making sure students “sound” like a native rather than actually understanding what is being said. It’s one thing imitate the speaking and writing of native-language … Continue reading Dispelling Five Common Myths About Teaching ESL/ELL to Write

English Idioms Explained

An idiom is an expression with a figurative meaning that is different from the literal meaning. Idioms are heard every day–in conversation, in literature and in media. Idioms are frequently used because it’s a short way to express more complicated ideas. They also help add color to your writing by introducing topics in a different way. If you do decide to use idioms; use them … Continue reading English Idioms Explained

Outside the Classroom Tips for Learning English

  Learning a new language is difficult, but that doesn’t mean it should be boring. Here are some helpful tips to make learning English more fun: 1. Find a Conversation Partner  I spent four years of high school learning Spanish. I can also probably tell you exactly how many minutes I spoke Spanish because it was limited to the five minutes of conversation for participation … Continue reading Outside the Classroom Tips for Learning English

Rejecting Thesaurus Temptations and Finding Comfort in Simplicity

On an episode of F.R.I.E.N.D.S, a classic American television sitcom, Joey struggles with writing a recommendation letter to an adoption agency for his friends Monica and Chandler. To make himself sound smarter, Joey decides to use the thesaurus on every single word. Sentences like “they’re warm, nice people with big hearts” become “they’re humid pre-possessing homosapiens with full sized aortic pumps.” Joey’s kind and sincere … Continue reading Rejecting Thesaurus Temptations and Finding Comfort in Simplicity

From Trilingual to Monolingual: Losing My Chinese Dialects and Learning English

As the newest ESL/ELL Peer Counselor, I thought it would be fitting to talk about my experience with the English language. English is not my first language. It’s also not my second language. I grew up listening and speaking an amalgamation of three different Chinese dialects: Mandarin, Cantonese, and Fujianese. Most children played with dolls and teddy bears; I spent the first four-and-a-half years of … Continue reading From Trilingual to Monolingual: Losing My Chinese Dialects and Learning English

Thinking in Math: How Certain Languages Make Learning Math Easier

“一二 , 一二 (one two, one two),” I counted as my tiny toddler feet ascended the stairs. The first two Chinese numbers were—according to my mom—my first words. Growing up, my peers at school would always joke about the stereotype that Asians (specifically, Chinese Asians) were good at math. Although it does not always hold true that Chinese students can solve linear differential equations faster … Continue reading Thinking in Math: How Certain Languages Make Learning Math Easier

Introduction to Introductions

Writing the introduction paragraph is always my favorite part of any essay. A good introduction sets the tone and structure of the entire paper. Writing a strong, solid introduction sets your paper up for success. Different styles of papers (i.e., analysis, narrative, research) call for different kinds of introductions. In general, the “funnel” introduction is the most common for papers involving literary analysis. As the … Continue reading Introduction to Introductions

How to Begin an Essay

Topic sentence is one sentence that states what will be proved in your paragraph. It includes the title of the piece of literature and its author. General statement, major statements, major reasons are referring to a one-sentence subtopic of the topic sentence. For example, if your topic sentence states that University of California, Los Angeles is a great university to attend for your future, your … Continue reading How to Begin an Essay