On Writing: How to start Journaling for Mental and Emotional Health

You have probably heard of journaling as a cliche therapy practice. Journaling is recommended to help you start to process your feelings and to help you start to get in touch with things from your past that may be affecting your emotions now.   I have spent the latter part of the last few years resisting journaling. I was always afraid of what I would … Continue reading On Writing: How to start Journaling for Mental and Emotional Health

Grammar Police: Less or Fewer

“15 items or less.” We see them whenever we go to Walmart or Target, but these ubiquitous signs are actually grammatically incorrect. Why? “Less” is used to describe something that isn’t discrete, but “fewer” describes a countable object. Consider this simple question to determine which form to use: can you count it? If you can count it, use fewer. If you can’t count it, use … Continue reading Grammar Police: Less or Fewer

Tips on Writing Timed Essays

This is an archived post by Pegah Mahmoud originally published on May 15, 2017. This article talks about how to write timed essays, such as those that you would write in class during midterms and finals.   Tick. Tock. Tick. Tock. All you can hear is the resonating sound of the clock, letting you know how much time you’ve already wasted just by paying attention … Continue reading Tips on Writing Timed Essays

On Writing: How to Improve the Quality of Your Writing

Learning to improve your writing can be really difficult, especially when you have to incorporate difficult topics into your papers. Here are some tips to help you improve the quality of your writing:   Brainstorm This allows you to sit down and think about the concepts that you are learning in your classes. When you skip this step, you waste valuable time by trying to … Continue reading On Writing: How to Improve the Quality of Your Writing

Character Creation

Make characters that jump off the page and wag their finger at you; characters that lead armies into epic battles on your coffee table or cuddle up on your shoulder for a quick nap; characters that pilot jet planes in circle-eights around your head or trek into the great unknown called Underthebed with just a backpack. Your characters should come alive, enthralling your readers. Your … Continue reading Character Creation

5 Tips To Ace Your Next Paper

As midterm season approaches, many of us in writing-heavy majors are dreading the papers we are going to have to write. Whether it be a research paper, a close-reading paper, or a paper of any other variety, here are some tips I’ve found helpful for acing my papers. 1)    Read the prompt very carefully: This goes without saying, but many people do not give the … Continue reading 5 Tips To Ace Your Next Paper

“[Archive]”:Structure Your Writing: A Guide to Organizing Your Papers

Structure Your Writing: A Guide to Organizing Your Papers Your professors may have recommended that you structure your papers better (I know mine have!) but never explained what they meant by that. In this handout, we will discuss what structured writing is and how it can be achieved. What is Structured Writing? Structure is a vital ingredient for any type of effective writing from academic … Continue reading “[Archive]”:Structure Your Writing: A Guide to Organizing Your Papers

How to Start Writing Again

Writing is liberating. Writing is empowering. Writing requires vulnerability. How many of us have struggled with writing at one point or another? How many of us have felt guilt or shame for not being able to sit down and start typing those words and thoughts circulating in our minds? What are some things we can do to start writing again?    For when you are … Continue reading How to Start Writing Again

How Do You Approach Getting Out of Writer’s Block?

This is an archived post from April 3, 2017 written by Pegah Mahmoud. We’ve all heard of the dreaded writer’s block: the figurative cement wall that blocks our ability to surround ourselves with creative and thoughtful ideas. And like a cement wall, it feels impossible to break through it when we see our mind as something much weaker than it. We groan, we curse, we become … Continue reading How Do You Approach Getting Out of Writer’s Block?

“[Archive]”: On The Importance of Outlining”

This is an archived post from November 20th written by Ananya Bhargava. If you know me, you probably know that I’m a BIG advocate for outlining (seriously, I’d wear a shirt to show my support if I could). For social sciences, more than any other discipline, writing an outline is a crucial step in the essay writing process. Outlining is important for various reasons. For … Continue reading “[Archive]”: On The Importance of Outlining”

Archive: It vs. It’s, The Final Showdown

This is an archived post from 10/20/2014 by Paul Simon Yim. It’s really hard, sometimes, to know when to use its or it’s. We’ve been taught, since elementary school, that whenever we want to indicate a possessive noun that an apostrophe must be used. For example, This is Cindy’s car. That is Brian’s computer. What we often forget, however, is that when we want to use a pronoun … Continue reading Archive: It vs. It’s, The Final Showdown

Subtlety = Sub-Till-Tea

Subtlety sub-till-tea n. the act of avoiding an unpleasant situation through clever maneuvering. Literally: waiting under a rock until tea time. Words are pretty cool. They let you write a letter confessing your love to your crush, understand your favorite Friends episode, tell your roommate to stop stealing your food, or negotiate a pay raise with your boss. If you’re like me, you like words … Continue reading Subtlety = Sub-Till-Tea

On My Creative Writing Process

Picture this. You’re sitting at your desk, trying hard to come up with a good sentence, the kind of sentence that would make the likes of Isaac Babel and Joan Didion proud. Five minutes in, you lower your expectations—not everyone can write like Junot Diaz, you say. You settle for writing a relatively good sentence. Another five minutes pass by—your cursor blinks mockingly. Okay, you … Continue reading On My Creative Writing Process

Writing: Liberation or Revelation of our Innermost, Deepest Fears?

My relationship with writing has mostly been a positive one. Throughout my K-12 education, I was frequently praised for my wordsmithing capabilities, flowery prose, and succinct summarization skills. But as far as my creative writing went, I only wrote random diary entries regarding any interactions with my crushes and drama between my best friends. I rarely used writing as a means to truly connect with … Continue reading Writing: Liberation or Revelation of our Innermost, Deepest Fears?

The Chicken and the Egg: Reading and Writing

More often than not, students believe that the only way to improve their writing is to use fancy vocabulary words and to memorize arbitrary grammar rules. However, they’ll quickly find that blindly focusing on technical skills is not the answer. Rather, the answer may not even lie in the act of writing itself. Studies show that reading and writing go hand-in-hand: the more you read, … Continue reading The Chicken and the Egg: Reading and Writing

Introduction to Introductions

Writing the introduction paragraph is always my favorite part of any essay. A good introduction sets the tone and structure of the entire paper. Writing a strong, solid introduction sets your paper up for success. Different styles of papers (i.e., analysis, narrative, research) call for different kinds of introductions. In general, the “funnel” introduction is the most common for papers involving literary analysis. As the … Continue reading Introduction to Introductions

The Poetic Fallacy: On Why Anyone Can Write Poetry

Though it may not come as a shocker to many, I am an English major. What this means is that my classes often involve me reading hundreds of pages of texts each quarter, arguing in class about whether the color blue in a poem represents sadness or the sky, and writing papers about how the characters in “Miss Ogilvy Finds Herself” and “Albert Nobbs” are … Continue reading The Poetic Fallacy: On Why Anyone Can Write Poetry