Suggested Reading: Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain

Do you need some more motivation to actually start implementing a more consistent exercise regimen into your daily routine? We all know that it is good for us and that we need to exercise at least a few days a week, but what is actually stopping us from exercising more regularly? It is difficult to start implementing exercise into our daily routines, but using some … Continue reading Suggested Reading: Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain

Thinking in Math: How Certain Languages Make Learning Math Easier

“一二 , 一二 (one two, one two),” I counted as my tiny toddler feet ascended the stairs. The first two Chinese numbers were—according to my mom—my first words. Growing up, my peers at school would always joke about the stereotype that Asians (specifically, Chinese Asians) were good at math. Although it does not always hold true that Chinese students can solve linear differential equations faster … Continue reading Thinking in Math: How Certain Languages Make Learning Math Easier

Learn With Curiosity

Ever wondered what Stephen Hawking’s thesis looked like? Or why you always seem to gain back any weight you try to lose? How about what’s killing galaxies? Curiosity is an informational website and app that creates and gathers articles and videos on all kinds of interesting topics so you can learn and get inspired. There’s lots to like about Curiosity. It’s well-organized and has plenty … Continue reading Learn With Curiosity

“[Archive]:” Suggested Reading: Jhumpa Lahiri’s Interpreter of Maladies

This is an archived post from October 24th written by Ananya Bhargava. Interpreter of Maladies is a short-story collection by Indian author, Jhumpa Lahiri. It is not one of her most commercially popular books but it is my favorite because her books changed my perspective on writing. When I began first writing, I was inspired by the work of authors like Jane Austen so I … Continue reading “[Archive]:” Suggested Reading: Jhumpa Lahiri’s Interpreter of Maladies

On Procrastination: The Instant Gratification Monkey Inside all of us

As students, we usually tend to procrastinate on homework, reading, term papers, and studying. It seems commonplace and it’s always a relief to hear that your fellow peers are also procrastinating on their assignments. Lots of college culture is accepting of the fact that we procrastinate, but have you ever stopped to think about why we do it? What is going on in my mind … Continue reading On Procrastination: The Instant Gratification Monkey Inside all of us

Art in Science: “Leave of Absence” by Michael McGowan

As a life science major, the majority of the texts I read are academic, scientific, and generally lacking in emotion. Although these readings are informative, they make me appreciate the few times when I stumble across science literature that pulls at the heartstrings. The Beat is a student-initiated journal that combines the worlds of science and art. It’s a collection of artwork, photography, and creative … Continue reading Art in Science: “Leave of Absence” by Michael McGowan

What to Read to Expand Your General Knowledge

As a college student, I often find myself swamped with things to do for class: research papers, prepping for lecture, completing weekly mini-essays, labs, studying for midterms and finals, and readings — lots and lots of readings. On top of that, I make/find my meals, do laundry, wash the dishes, clean the counters, and do everything else I need to do to be a functional … Continue reading What to Read to Expand Your General Knowledge

Hard-Boiled Detective Fiction Writer: Raymond Chandler

Summertime brings to mind three things: high temperatures, Hollywood-style sexual tension, and good, old-fashioned mystery. The High Window by Raymond Chandler delivers it all on a silver ash tray — with colorful characters, a hard-boiled detective, clandestine crime, and witticisms to delight your debonair heart. It’s a classic murder mystery novel, and I can’t believe I only now found out about Chandler considering how much he … Continue reading Hard-Boiled Detective Fiction Writer: Raymond Chandler

#SummerReadingChallenge

It’s summer! And whether you’re vacationing at the beach, interning at a company, or just chillaxing at home, summer’s the best time for some good, fun reading. If you don’t know where to start, take part in the #SummerReadingChallenge and try some of WSP’s suggested summer reading. We’ll recommend a new title every week, so you’ll have plenty to look forward to. We wish you … Continue reading #SummerReadingChallenge

Humor Online: McSweeney’s Internet Tendency

Here’s a problem that has plagued literature lovers through the years: you like reading, but books are expensive. How do you satisfy your bibliophilia if you don’t have money? While the library used to be the go-to place for penny-pinching readers in the past, the Internet is the modern poor reader’s lifeblood. From blogs to poetry to short stories to full-length novels, the Internet makes … Continue reading Humor Online: McSweeney’s Internet Tendency

Reunion by John Cheever

Reunion is two pages long. It’ll probably take you less than ten minutes to finish. But the story will stay with you for a lot longer than that. You’ll get immersed in the dialogue, attached to the characters, and wholly invested in the story. And the final words will echo in your mind and sink into your stomach and leave you with an inexplicable sense of … Continue reading Reunion by John Cheever

Kendrick Lamar’s ‘DAMN.’

Kendrick Lamar is back at it again with his fourth album “DAMN.”  This album discusses the themes of wickedness and weakness, lust and love, and it centers on the complexity of contradictions that Lamar feels. He writes about important issues such as racism, equality, media, fame and so forth. His lyrics allow readers to gain an insight on how Kendrick feels in regards to his success as well … Continue reading Kendrick Lamar’s ‘DAMN.’

Try Your Hand at “Assimilation,” by E. L. Doctorow

For busy college students like me whose reading mainly consists of textbooks and articles for class, or anyone with little time on their hands, reading full-length novels from start to finish can feel quite daunting. Luckily, there are all kinds of things to read in the bookstore, the library, or out in the World Wide Web — from 500-plus page novels, to shorter novellas or … Continue reading Try Your Hand at “Assimilation,” by E. L. Doctorow

Michel Foucault’s “The History of Sexuality”

Ever since coming to UCLA, I can never find the time between my academics, work, extracurriculars, family, relationships, or social life to just read books for the sake of reading. Anything I do read during the quarter is often assigned through my classes and they’re often terribly boring and dry. These past few years at UCLA, I’ve wistfully day dreamt of reading something like Harry … Continue reading Michel Foucault’s “The History of Sexuality”

Unsplendid Magazine – a tribute to the traditional

I stumbled upon Unsplendid Magazine on accident, actually. I was looking through a list of online literary journals and saw Unsplendid on the list. Intrigued by the title, I Googled the name, found their website, and was greeted with the front cover of their latest issue. Its description: “an online journal of poetry in received and nonce forms.” I clicked on an issue and began to … Continue reading Unsplendid Magazine – a tribute to the traditional

“A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings”

Gabriel García Márquez’s, “A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings” is a short story about a man named Pelayo and his wife Elisenda who profit off of an old man with enormous wings that Pelayo finds in his backyard. Throughout the story, Pelayo and his wife allow visitors to come and see the old man who resides in their house. They ask the wise neighbor … Continue reading “A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings”

It Wasn’t Until I Was an Old Woman that I Began to Enjoy Being Beautiful

A few weeks ago, our team at WSP started to focus on creative nonfiction, a literary genre that Wikipedia defines as the utilization of  “literary styles and techniques to create factually accurate narratives.” Basically, it’s supposed to be a true story but written in a creative manner that is supposed to entertain the reader. Learning more about the genre, I decided to go online and … Continue reading It Wasn’t Until I Was an Old Woman that I Began to Enjoy Being Beautiful

Poetic Music: Rihanna’s Anti

Long before stories were recorded down as written word, people would tell tales to each other incorporating the medium of music. Songs incorporated both words and melody, which I think made it easier for people to remember them. Today, we often don’t consider popular music as venerated literature because it is so accessible and ubiquitous. However, when we take a deeper look into song lyrics, … Continue reading Poetic Music: Rihanna’s Anti

The Tender Bar by J.R. Moehringer

August 2016. Returning from a grueling nine weeks of intensive Japanese classes, I decided to spend the remaining four weeks of summer break by lounging on the couch eating noodles and catching up on all the books I hadn’t had a chance to read during the school year. After three weeks reveling in all the stress-free goodness of break though, I discovered to my dismay … Continue reading The Tender Bar by J.R. Moehringer