Janet Brown Scholarship Recipient Essay: David Nguyen

Every year, the Writing Success Program and the Community Program’s Office awards student leaders who have encountered financial barriers, a scholarship in honor of our founding director, Janet E. Brown. We asked applications for the story behind the most meaningful object in their lives. Read down before for this recipient’s story: My most meaningful object is the acceptance letter to the UCLA McNair Scholars Program, … Continue reading Janet Brown Scholarship Recipient Essay: David Nguyen

Janet Brown Memorial Scholarship 2018

$1000 Scholarship Rewarded to undergraduate students who demonstrate both a commitment to leadership/community involvement and financial need. Janet Brown and Her Legacy Janet Brown was the founding director of the Writing Success Program (WSP) and a valuable member of the Community Programs Office (CPO).  A well-read, unapologetically quirky, politically astute, and compassionate person, Janet was a mentor to students and staff alike.  Janet’s questions, guidance, … Continue reading Janet Brown Memorial Scholarship 2018

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

Since May is Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, I decided to compile a list of some of the most notable Asian American Pacific Islanders in history. Keep in mind that this list is not comprehensive. 1. Fred Korematsu: A civil rights activist who objected to the internment of Japanese Americans during WWII. 2. Vincent Chin: Chinese American man who was severely beaten. His death sparked … Continue reading Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

In American Politics, How Do We Choose Who to Help?

Humans are social creatures; we are always trying to please someone, whether they be a boss, a friend, a crush, or a stranger. The hard part is choosing WHO we want to make happy because it’s impossible to please everyone. Conflict doesn’t occur simply because one individual decides it would be a good idea to argue with another. Instead, as social psychologist Kurt Lewin point … Continue reading In American Politics, How Do We Choose Who to Help?

Careers for Bilingual Speakers

As the world becomes increasingly connected through globalization, the ability to speak more than one language has become increasingly crucial in the workplace. This week, I’ve compiled a list of interesting careers that are suitable for bilingual people. Social Worker (Avg. $43,619) – A social worker is heavily involved in personal details of their client’s lives. They are often tasked with visiting families, identifying their … Continue reading Careers for Bilingual Speakers

Made in America: Popular “Chinese” Food

After making a recipe book as my creative project for one of my Asian American Studies classes, I couldn’t stop thinking about food. We often consume without much thought but there are so much culture and history behind each dish. I wanted to devote this blog post to the supposed “Chinese” foods that were created in America. Below is a list of some interesting dishes … Continue reading Made in America: Popular “Chinese” Food

It Is In Mortality That We Learn About Life

On Monday morning as I traipsed to class, I happened to glance at an advertisement about the charms of the anthropology major: “It is in mortality that we learn about life.” Odd, but somehow, the statement commanded verity. I nodded mentally in acknowledgement and continued past the poster. The rest of the day wore on with classes, chores, meetings, and work. By the time I … Continue reading It Is In Mortality That We Learn About Life

Privileged Complexions

Why do light skinned people in all Races and Ethnicities have more Privilege than their darker complexion counter parts? As I was growing up, I was constantly praised for my light skin and light brown hair. My classmates would tell me that they were jealous of my skin color and told me that I was prettier than them because of it. As an eight year … Continue reading Privileged Complexions

Chopstick Noises: Being Political as an Asian American

On the first day of senior year in highschool, I walked into my AP US Government class nervous and expectant; nervous because it was my first class of the day and expectant because it was an elective I chose on my own. It only took forty minutes, the duration of the class, for me to realize that the class would be difficult. For one, I … Continue reading Chopstick Noises: Being Political as an Asian American

If Not You, Who?: The Dangers of Political Indifference

Political engagement is the theme for the Writing Success Program’s developmental blog this quarter. Naturally, this context made me wonder about whether I’ve been doing my part to fulfill my civic duty as an American citizen. And in the wake of the passing new year, I’ve spent countless hours reflecting on all of the events that happened during 2017. Because of the American media’s propensity … Continue reading If Not You, Who?: The Dangers of Political Indifference

Politics? What Politics?

I feel I am not political at all. It’s almost embarrassing to say, but I am not political at all. Being raised in a household where the main religion is Jehovah Witness, politics are avoided and not talked about. I know I can educate myself on the subject since I am now an adult and can think for myself; however, I have been bounded by … Continue reading Politics? What Politics?

What Makes a Person Political?

The following piece is written by Keson Chen, a WSP Winter 2018 intern, responding to the Winter 2018 Developmental Blog question: What makes you political?  What makes a person political? Well, it’s hard to say. Anything happening in one’s life can change his perception and ideology of the world, and what we call Democrats or Republicans are merely the two typical modes of ideologies that … Continue reading What Makes a Person Political?

Music on My Mind

The following piece is written by Maggie Bui, a WSP Winter 2018 intern, responding to a Janet Brown power question: When am I most naturally myself?  The light dims and the audience holds its breath in anticipation. The sound of rotating helicopter blades fills the theater for a good ten seconds. Then, the conductor looks to the percussion section, and with a swish of his … Continue reading Music on My Mind

When I Am Most Naturally Myself, and What to Do With It

The following piece is written by Keson Chen, a WSP Winter 2018 intern, responding to a Janet Brown power question: When am I most naturally myself?  When am I most naturally myself? When I pose this question to myself, I somehow feel it would be better to rephrase the question as following “When does my beginner’s mind manifest itself?” Since the beginner’s mind is a … Continue reading When I Am Most Naturally Myself, and What to Do With It