“kill! kill! kill!”

Around this time last year, I was going through the worst heartbreak of my life. I was in a one-sided relationship with someone I never should have developed feelings for. “It’s just sex,” he warned. Unsurprisingly, I didn’t listen. I fell for him and my feelings were not reciprocated. After this, he moved up north and the unhealthy one-sided relationship continued for months, but now … Continue reading “kill! kill! kill!”

All Work and No Play Makes Jack a Dull Boy

I recently read an article on BBC called “Is There An Upside to Having No Social Life?” I found the article as I was scrolling through BBC on one of my rare days of connectedness. As one who strives to have a very active social life and is forced through a dearth of friends to have a not-so-active social life, I found this title particularly … Continue reading All Work and No Play Makes Jack a Dull Boy

Trump Breaks Campaign Promise but Continues Efforts to Weaken Obamacare

On September 25, President Trump’s attempt to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was overturned when Republican senator Susan Collins voted against the motion. Repealing and replacing Obamacare was one of Trump’s main campaign promises; it is evident now that the president will be unable to fulfill his promise, at least within his first year in office. According to the New York Times, Republicans, believing … Continue reading Trump Breaks Campaign Promise but Continues Efforts to Weaken Obamacare

Daily Tidbit: Study Tip

We often study by simply re-reading or rewriting our lecture notes. However, we trick ourselves into thinking we know everything when we are simply recognizing the information. And just like we are good at recognizing faces, we are really good at recognizing our notes. However, this does not mean that we truly understand them. Instead, take a blank sheet of paper and write down questions … Continue reading Daily Tidbit: Study Tip

On Procrastination: The Instant Gratification Monkey Inside all of us

As students, we usually tend to procrastinate on homework, reading, term papers, and studying. It seems commonplace and it’s always a relief to hear that your fellow peers are also procrastinating on their assignments. Lots of college culture is accepting of the fact that we procrastinate, but have you ever stopped to think about why we do it? What is going on in my mind … Continue reading On Procrastination: The Instant Gratification Monkey Inside all of us

On My Creative Writing Process

Picture this. You’re sitting at your desk, trying hard to come up with a good sentence, the kind of sentence that would make the likes of Isaac Babel and Joan Didion proud. Five minutes in, you lower your expectations—not everyone can write like Junot Diaz, you say. You settle for writing a relatively good sentence. Another five minutes pass by—your cursor blinks mockingly. Okay, you … Continue reading On My Creative Writing Process

Navigating Undergraduate Research Opportunities at UCLA

If you’re an undergraduate student at UCLA looking to get into research, it can feel overwhelming to try and navigate the hundreds of opportunities this research university has to offer. How can you be sure that you won’t be stuck in a basement for hours entering numbers into an Excel sheet? That you’ll receive proper mentorship and guidance? Once you know what you’re applying for, … Continue reading Navigating Undergraduate Research Opportunities at UCLA

Art in Science: “Leave of Absence” by Michael McGowan

As a life science major, the majority of the texts I read are academic, scientific, and generally lacking in emotion. Although these readings are informative, they make me appreciate the few times when I stumble across science literature that pulls at the heartstrings. The Beat is a student-initiated journal that combines the worlds of science and art. It’s a collection of artwork, photography, and creative … Continue reading Art in Science: “Leave of Absence” by Michael McGowan

Writing: Liberation or Revelation of our Innermost, Deepest Fears?

My relationship with writing has mostly been a positive one. Throughout my K-12 education, I was frequently praised for my wordsmithing capabilities, flowery prose, and succinct summarization skills. But as far as my creative writing went, I only wrote random diary entries regarding any interactions with my crushes and drama between my best friends. I rarely used writing as a means to truly connect with … Continue reading Writing: Liberation or Revelation of our Innermost, Deepest Fears?

Reducing Commitments as a Form of Self-Care

Being incredibly busy all the time will burn anyone out, and overworking yourself can cause you to harm yourself and your health. As students, we have to maintain busy schedules to earn our majors, work a job, or to get into grad school, but we also need to ensure that we are not affecting our health during the process.   You often hear about self-care … Continue reading Reducing Commitments as a Form of Self-Care

Why Poverty is the Result of Systematic Failure

In middle school, my economics class cited reasons for why people earn different wages. One of the reasons was skill. Some jobs required high levels of skill while some required low levels of skill; the level of skill demanded by the job was directly proportional to its wage. The textbook defined mentally laborious work as high skill and physically laborious work as low skill. This … Continue reading Why Poverty is the Result of Systematic Failure

The Department of Homeland Security To Begin Tracking Social Media of Immigrants

Last week, the Department of Homeland Security published a new rule stating that they would be collecting “social media handles, aliases, associated identifiable information, and search results” affiliated with all immigrants to the United States. Permanent resident card holders as well as naturalized citizens will not be exempt. Buzzfeed News first broke the story on Monday, which has since been picked up by most major … Continue reading The Department of Homeland Security To Begin Tracking Social Media of Immigrants

What to Read to Expand Your General Knowledge

As a college student, I often find myself swamped with things to do for class: research papers, prepping for lecture, completing weekly mini-essays, labs, studying for midterms and finals, and readings — lots and lots of readings. On top of that, I make/find my meals, do laundry, wash the dishes, clean the counters, and do everything else I need to do to be a functional … Continue reading What to Read to Expand Your General Knowledge

The Chicken and the Egg: Reading and Writing

More often than not, students believe that the only way to improve their writing is to use fancy vocabulary words and to memorize arbitrary grammar rules. However, they’ll quickly find that blindly focusing on technical skills is not the answer. Rather, the answer may not even lie in the act of writing itself. Studies show that reading and writing go hand-in-hand: the more you read, … Continue reading The Chicken and the Egg: Reading and Writing

WSP is Hiring for 2017-2018

Be a part of the longest running writing support service on the UCLA campus! If you’re interested in writing, education, leadership, and community building, join the WSP team! We help students develop their voice and become more confident with their academic, personal/creative, and professional writing. We also help our staff become great leaders through working with diverse communities. As a team, the WSP staff works to … Continue reading WSP is Hiring for 2017-2018

What’s Happening at UCLA this Summer?

UCLA is bringing on the heat this summer. The Bruin campus has been abuzz with activity lately with two professional soccer teams practicing, Nickelodeon’s Kid’s Choice Sports Awards, freshman orientation sessions, a plethora of summer camps, and even an unfounded bomb threat. With so much going on, campus security has stepped it up a notch, leaving some students frustrated with the disturbances. UCLA has blocked … Continue reading What’s Happening at UCLA this Summer?

Hard-Boiled Detective Fiction Writer: Raymond Chandler

Summertime brings to mind three things: high temperatures, Hollywood-style sexual tension, and good, old-fashioned mystery. The High Window by Raymond Chandler delivers it all on a silver ash tray — with colorful characters, a hard-boiled detective, clandestine crime, and witticisms to delight your debonair heart. It’s a classic murder mystery novel, and I can’t believe I only now found out about Chandler considering how much he … Continue reading Hard-Boiled Detective Fiction Writer: Raymond Chandler

#SummerReadingChallenge

It’s summer! And whether you’re vacationing at the beach, interning at a company, or just chillaxing at home, summer’s the best time for some good, fun reading. If you don’t know where to start, take part in the #SummerReadingChallenge and try some of WSP’s suggested summer reading. We’ll recommend a new title every week, so you’ll have plenty to look forward to. We wish you … Continue reading #SummerReadingChallenge

Why I am indebted to BruinView

“This is too good to be true.” When I read the job description for WSP’s “Writing and Creativity Counselor” on BruinView, that was my first thought: this is too good to be true. I’d get to help people develop confidence in their writing and writing abilities? AND get paid for it? I didn’t believe it – I never imagined that a job like that could … Continue reading Why I am indebted to BruinView